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Past Meetings (March 1999 - May 2010)

Back to the calendar - current events

Tuesday, April 27, 2010, 7:30 pm, at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public. Refreshments begin at 7:15 pm. Merchandise sales are before and after the program (cash/checks only).  The plant raffle follows the program.  

Before the meeting at 7pm: Chapter members -- come early to give your input on any topics you may wish to discuss with board members.

"Fire Effects Monitoring of Pineland Croton in Everglades National Park" - Aerin D. Land, Biological Science Technician, Fire and Aviation Management, Everglades National Park

The fire-dependant pine rocklands ecosystem supports diverse communities of flora and fauna, including many rare and imperiled species.  Fire is an essential, but sometimes controversial, tool used to maintain the structure and diversity of this habitat.  In 2005, monitoring was initiated to assess the impact of fire on two rare butterflies, the Florida leafwing and Bartram’s Hairstreak, and their host plant, pineland croton (Croton linearis).   Learn about the results and how they might affect adaptive fire management to maintain rare butterfly habitats. 

Also, George N. Avery Award recipients Victor Moas, Jesus Melendez and Robert Wollberg will speak about their science fair project, "Breaking the Dormancy of Senna mexicana Seeds."


Tuesday, March 23, 2010, 7:30 pm, at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public. Refreshments begin at 7:15pm. Merchandise sales are before and after the program (cash/checks only).  The plant raffle follows the program. (This is the 4th Tuesday, not the last)

Before the meeting at 7pm: Chapter members -- come early to give your input on any topics you may wish to discuss with board members.

Program: "Coastal Habitat Restoration and Science-Based Monitoring Efforts in Southeast Florida" - Gary R. Milano, Natural Resource Division, Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management

Modifications of freshwater inflow and past dredging and filling practices have resulted in serious degradation to the south Florida ecosystem.  South Florida historical natural communities are being restored on publicly owned lands through the cooperative efforts of federal, state, and local agencies.  Restoration techniques and innovative habitat designs have been developed and tested.  Monitoring efforts are documenting the results of some factors on taxonomic diversity, nursery fish habitat, bird habitat, crocodile habitat, and rookery areas.  Gary will discuss these and other aspects of the program and indicators of its overall success.

Mr. Milano is the Coastal Habitat Restoration Coordinator for the Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM).  He has successfully completed over 50 habitat restoration efforts during his 28 years with DERM.  He has coordinated the restoration of over 500 acres of wetlands, 150 acres of coastal strand and dune community, 150 acres of tropical hardwood hammock, and 22 islands in Biscayne Bay.  His commitment and enthusiasm has enabled him to gather widespread government and public support, and participation from the community for his program. 

Also, Jonathan Prendergast, one of our 2010 Science Fair Award recipients, will make a short presentation on his project, "Interpreting the nutrient limitations, salinity, and seasonal variations of Florida Bay in order to analyze shifts in species and biomass productivity".  (See details elsewhere in this issue).

April 27: Fire effects monitoring of pineland croton in Everglades National Park to assess the impacts on two rare butterflies  - Aerin D. Land


Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 7:30 pm, at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Garden House, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Program: "The Making and Remaking of a Garden” - Georgia Tasker, writer for Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden and former garden writer for the Miami Herald

Georgia Tasker will share her experiences in planning and planting and why her garden has taken its particular shape, color and texture.  She will discuss some of the ideas that went into making the garden and some of the happy accidents that have occurred along the way.

Georgia writes and blogs for Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden. She was the garden writer for The Miami Herald for more than 30 years.  She has received Fairchild’s highest honor, the Barbour Medal, and a lifetime achievement award from Tropical Audubon Society.  Her book Wild Things, based on a series of her articles in the Miami Herald, was published by FNPS in 1984, and she received the Green Palmetto Award from FNPS in 1986.  Georgia also is an avid photographer, gardener and traveler, and currently serves as chair of the Florida group of the Society of Woman Geographers.


Tuesday, January 26, 2010, 7:30 pm at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road. 

Program: "Cities, Climate Change and Ecological Landscaping" - Dr. Jack Parker, Professor Emeritus, Florida International University, Dept. of Environmental Sciences

This presentation will discuss the latest science of climate change, including the projected environmental impacts on natural systems.  It will include an evaluation of alternative solutions to global warming, particularly the role of trees in urban areas.

Dr. Parker's teaching and research focus on ecological landscaping, passive solar cooling, climate change mitigation, energy and resource conservation, environmental housing, energy policy and environmental education.  He is particularly interested in applications in warm, humid climates and in less-developed countries as well as local community projects. 


Tuesday, November 24, 2009, 7:30 pm at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road. 

"Weeds and Seeds: A History of Dining in Southern Florida" - Dr. Michele Williams, Florida Public Archaeology Network.      

This lecture examines various plants utilized by early Floridians as well as some of the "meatier" issues of early diet in south Florida.  Learn how the wealth of natural resources in southern Florida has made it a unique dining experience for over 10,000 years.  Michele Williams, Ph.D., RPA is the Director and Terrestrial Archaeologist for the Southeastern Region of Florida Public Archaeology Network.  Her specialty within archaeology is the use of plants by prehistoric Native Americans.  She has participated in digs throughout the southeastern United States for the past 20 years.


Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 7:30 pm at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road. 

"Public Paradise: The Early Park Architecture of Dade County" - Rocco Ceo, Professor, Univ. of Miami School of Architecture. 

Greynolds Park was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps, officially opening on March 29, 1936.  The following is from an abstract of Mr. Ceo's essay, Building Close to Nature, about early Dade County parks architecture.

"The interaction between landscape and architecture so carefully conceived under the direction of William Lyman Phillips, R.C. Ward and Prentiss French and the youth of the CCC established a new building standard for South Florida that intimately linked architecture to the landscape  … The use of graphic design guidelines adapted to the unique regional conditions blended ideal forms to site found materials and local methods of construction.  … the new park architecture reflected the confrontation between man and nature in a unique landscape, a landscape made of seasonal forest fires, devastating hurricanes, and tropical flora and fauna unique to the United States ."

Mr. Ceo teaches courses in Design and Drawing and is the author of several books.  He has produced drawings of the elements of Florida’s landscapes as well as the documentation of seminal sites in the history of South Florida such as Vizcaya and the Marjory Stoneman Douglas home.  His published work includes the award winning books, Redland: A Preservation and Tourism Plan done with Margot Ammidown and Maria Nardi and Historic Landscapes of Florida co-authored with Joanna Lombard.  His architecture practice focuses on the unique relationship between architecture and landscape found in the American Tropics.


Tuesday, September 22, 2009, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road. 

"Alien Bee Pollinators Invade Florida" - Robert Pemberton, PhD, Invasive Plant Research Laboratory, USDA, Ft. Lauderdale.

Two neotropical bees have invaded south Florida. A beautiful metallic green orchid bee (Euglossa viridissima) was detected in 2003 and an oil-collecting bee (Centris nitida), which looks like a small bumblebee, was detected in 2007. Both bees have highly specialized as well as more generalized pollination activities depending on flower species with which they interact. Both are visiting a wide range of plants including invasive weeds which they may promote, non-native ornamentals which they could assist to naturalize, and natives which they could increase. 

Dr. Pemberton's activities at the USDA focus on biological control of invasive plants that impact Florida's natural areas.  These projects include Old World climbing fern (Lygodium microphyllum), air potato (Dioscorea bulbifera), skunk and sewer vines (Paederia foetida and P. crudassiana), and the lobate lac scale (Paratachardina pseudolobata). His invasive bee, orchid and pollination research is through affiliations with Fairchild, where he is a Senior Research Associate, and the Florida Museum of Natural History, where he is a Courtesy Curator at the Herbarium.


Tuesday, July 28, 2009.  6:30-9 p.m. (Not at Fairchild)

FNPS members and their guests (children welcome) are invited to this event.   If you are not yet a member, please join so you can enjoy all the activities of the chapter!  Address and directions are in the print newsletter sent to members.

What:  Annual Evening Yard Visit and Potluck Social.
Where:  Home of a member in Palmetto Bay. 
When:  6:30 - 9 pm. Come as early as you can to fully enjoy the yard and evening.  Guided yard tour about 7 pm., dinner after the tour, followed by the plant raffle.  You can stay later to sit around a bonfire and chat (fixings for "somemores" will be provided).
Bring:

  • Potluck dinner item or appetizer with serving utensil (the hosts will provide a variety of drinks, plates, etc.);
  • Raffle plants;
  • Lawn chairs if you want to be assured of a seat.  Dress for heat and possible mosquitoes (bring repellant just in case). 

This 1.64 acre natural forest community contains hammock and wetland plants. Oaks and pines dominate the high ground, while swamp bay, Dahoon holly and even a pond apple are on the lower ground. The property slopes down to an area of very ragged Miami oolite rock - a Karst topography - indicating a previous seasonal flooding before a canal was made.  The house was built into the hammock, using native Dade County Pine that was salvaged in the 1960s from huge piles of bulldozed trees waiting to be burned after land clearing for housing in South Dade.  The house has a very open design, for good reason: no air conditioning.  But it is very livable - amongst the natives!


Tuesday, June 23, 2009, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public. Refreshments begin at 7:15. Merchandise sales are before and after the program (cash/checks only).  Plant raffle follows the program.

"The Human and Natural History of South Florida" - Roger Hammer, Miami-Dade Parks.

Naturalist and author Roger Hammer will present a program on the history of South Florida, covering the time when South Florida became available for colonization by plants and animals, to the present. The talk includes the influences of people like Juan Ponce de Leon, Napoleon Bonaparte Broward, Henry Flagler, Julia Tuttle, Henry Perrine, and some early botanists.

Roger is Senior Interpretive Naturalist, Miami-Dade Parks Department, and Manager of Castellow Hammock Nature Center, since 1977.  He is also a frequent speaker, instructor and field trip leader, wildflower photographer and author of three books: Everglades Wildflowers" (2000), Florida Keys Wildflowers" (2002) and Exploring Everglades National Park and The Surrounding Area" (2004).  He was recipient of the first Marjory Stoneman Douglas Award presented by the Dade Chapter FNPS in 1982 for outstanding, consistent and constant service in the areas of education, research, promotion and preservation of native plants" and a Green Palmetto Award for Education from the FNPS in 2003.


Tuesday, May 26, 2009, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public. Refreshments begin at 7:15. Merchandise sales are before and after the program (cash/checks only).  Plant raffle follows the program.

"Florida Bats - Preserving and Protecting Native Bat Populations" - Cynthia and George Marks, Florida Bat Conservancy

Yes, there is a plant-bat connection!  Living and dead native plants (snags, Spanish moss, cabbage palms) provide habitat, and native habitats support many of the insects on which bats feed.  We can't describe the organization or speakers any better than the Bat Conservancy's website (www.floridabats.org):

"Bats are disappearing at alarming rates. Disturbance or destruction of roost sites due to development and vandalism is the greatest threat to the world's bats. Most bats living in Florida prefer to roost in mature or dead trees or in caves. However, many bats are squeezed out of urban areas due to loss of habitat or take up residence in buildings and become the targets for abuse. … Cynthia and George Marks, founders of the organization, began working with bats in 1989.  In 1994 they established the Florida Bat Center, a non profit organization for the purpose of protecting and preserving Florida's native bats. Over the past fifteen years they, along with staff and volunteers, have presented hundreds of educational programs about bats, rescued and cared for hundreds of injured and orphaned bats, worked with state and local agencies on numerous bat conservation projects, and helped home and business owners with bats in their buildings.  In 2006 the board of directors changed the name to the Florida Bat Conservancy."


Tuesday, April  28, 2009, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public. Refreshments begin at 7:15. Merchandise sales are before and after the program (cash/checks only).  Plant raffle follows the program.

Growing, Harvesting, Cleaning and Planting Native Florida Wildflower Seeds - Terry L. Zinn, Wildflowers of Florida, Inc.  

Terry will discuss the tips and techniques learned in 10 years of growing wildflowers for seed.  He will also talk about species that are available through the Florida Wildflower Cooperative (www.floridawildflowers.com) and the Florida Wildflower Foundation (floridawildflowerfoundation.org), whose mission is "to protect and replenish native wildflowers while increasing public knowledge of them as vital members of the state’s delicately balanced ecosystems."  Terry received an MS in Wildlife Ecology from UF but started growing wildflowers as a way to enhance his farm in Alachua County and was later encouraged to become a grower of seed.  "The rest is history!" he says.

Two more of our 2009 Science Fair Award recipients will make presentations on their projects.  (Read more in this issue!)


Tuesday, March 24, 2009, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.  (4th not the last Tuesday!)  Refreshments begin at 7:15. Merchandise sales are before and after the program (cash/checks only).

"The Benefits of Urban Tree Canopy and the Miami-Dade Community Image Advisory Board's Efforts to Achieve a Healthy 30% Tree Canopy Density" - Christina M. Casado, Community Image Manager, Miami-Dade County Office of Community Image

South Florida has experienced severe losses to its tree canopy in recent years. Hurricanes Katrina and Wilma destroyed 11,000 trees in local parks alone, and other losses due to storms and citrus canker are estimated to be even greater.  Adequate tree canopy is vital to the environmental and economic well being of our community.  Tree canopy coverage is currently estimated to be at 12% countywide and as low as 1% in some areas.  By national standards, healthy metropolitan areas should have 25 to 35% to receive the many benefits that canopy can provide. 

The Community Image Advisory Board (CIAB) is a multi-agency body whose mission is to improve the quality of life for residents and visitors in Miami-Dade County by enhancing the aesthetic quality of the major gateways, roadways, public spaces, and corridors; by increasing and restoring tree canopy; by developing landscaping projects; and by promoting a cleaner and greener Miami-Dade County.  In collaboration with its member agencies, the CIAB is planting trees and establishing policy direction, through the County’s Street Tree Master Plan and its implementation.  Come join the discussion!

Ms. Casado directs the County’s beautification and urban greening program. She has spent the last few decades immersed in the study and protection of South Florida ecosystems.  She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from Tufts University, a M.S. in Biology from the University of Missouri at St. Louis, and an M.B.A. from FIU.

We have an additional treat: Chris Sanchez, one of our 2009 Science Fair Award recipients, will make a short presentation on his project: "Interpreting the hydrological history of an Everglades wetland through microscopic characterization of phytoliths." 


Tuesday, February 24, 2009, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.
"
Miami's Native Ferns" - Jennifer Possley, Field Biologist, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden.

Jennifer Possley will review the native ferns of Miami, with a focus on identification, using cultivated samples of several species and many photos taken during her work as a field biologist in county parks.  She will also discuss the natural history of species she finds particularly interesting and describe her ongoing attempts to cultivate some of the rarest ones, despite claiming to have absolutely no natural horticultural ability.   Jennifer has spent over eight years as a field biologist at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden's Center for Tropical Plant Conservation, where she has conducted research on the flora of Miami-Dade County and slowly evolved into a fern enthusiast.  She received a master's degree in Agronomy from the University of Florida and worked as an AmeriCorps volunteer in Big Cypress National Preserve, removing the invasive tree, Melaleuca.  She is originally from the village of Dexter, Michigan.

Tuesday, January 27, 2009, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

"Hurricane Wilma's impacts on mangrove forest soil" - Kevin Whelan, Community Ecologist for the South Florida Caribbean Inventory and Monitoring Network.

Dr. Whelan studied Hurricane Wilma's impacts at a mangrove forest location along the Shark River, in Everglades National Park.  The initial impact showed a 37mm soil deposit by the storm.  After a year 10 mm was lost due to erosion and compaction.  But one year later, prolific growth of new live fine roots in the deposits suggested that the material on the site might become more stable -- erosion would decrease.  The findings thus far indicate that the soil elevation has made substantial gains compared to site specific relative sea-level rise.  Dr. Whelan has conducted research in South Florida, Costa Rican forests and wetlands, Mexican cloud forest, and Alaskan high arctic tundra. Research topics have included population dynamics of flora and fauna, hurricane and lightning disturbance, global warming, and restoration ecology. His South Florida research experiences show that everything is affected by regional dynamics crossing both political and natural boundaries.

This science-oriented talk will be presented with the non-scientist in mind, with lots of interesting pictures.  It's as an opportunity to broaden your knowledge and to see the Everglades you would otherwise not see.  (Didn't you always want to play in the mud?)


Tuesday, November 25, 2008, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

"New pests: What You Need to Know" -- Adrian Hunsberger UF/IFAS Miami-Dade Extension.

Adrian Hunsberger will discuss the new pests that are invading south Florida.  Many of these insects are new to the U.S. and are causing damage to native plants as well as non-native landscape plants. The natural enemies of some of these pests are already here so you'll learn how to manage these pests responsibly.  Some of the beneficial insects are mistaken for pests and are mistakenly destroyed.  Learn the difference!  Adrian is the Urban Horticulture Agent and Entomologist at the University of Florida Miami-Dade County Extension office in Homestead.

Refreshments begin at 7:15; merchandise sales are before and after the program (cash/checks only).  Check out our chapter t-shirts and denim shirts as well as a wide selection of books, ID cards, tote bags, gloves, loupes and other items -- all at permanently reduced prices in time for holiday shopping!

No meeting in December (but there are other activities).


Tuesday, October 28, 2008, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

"Connect to Protect: Fairchild's Pine Rockland Corridor Program" - Dr. Joyce Maschinski, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden.

Because even small changes in sea level rise are going to make large impacts on South Florida native plant communities in the next century, Fairchild has begun several initiatives to conserve rare plants of South Florida, including The Connect to Protect Network and experimental introductions of rare species.  Public and private cooperators in the corridor project will connect remaining pine rockland fragments and education campaigns are promoting natives plants as economically and environmentally sound choices for landscaping.   Dr. Joyce Maschinski will discuss the concepts, challenges and strategies for achieving the goals of the projects.  (More details in the "Connect to Protect" article in the newsletter.)  If time allows, she will also discuss recent findings regarding the varieties of native wildflower Lantana depressa and their hybrids with the invasive Lantana camara

Dr. Maschinski has been the Conservation Ecologist/ Team Leader at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden since 2002, leading a staff of botanists (Jennifer Possley, Sam Wright, Joie Goodman, Don Walters, Devon Powell) doing conservation research on South Florida native plants.  She received her doctorate from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff.  Her current research centers on understanding factors that limit reproduction, growth and expansion of rare plant populations. She is a member of FNPS.


Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

“Environmental Art and Green Architecture” - Rob Hopper, Landscape Architect, ASLA

Rob’s talk was inspired by innovative projects being built in Palm Beach County: the environmental art piece “Elder’s Cove” in the City of West Palm Beach and the green architecture building “Viva Verde” under construction in the City of Lake Worth. Both projects explore issues far beyond the typical art/architecture seen in South Florida. There are many definitions of both “environmental art” and “green architecture.” In general, each embraces innovative environmental components as part of their work.  The program will review of the history of both fields and explore the positive opportunities they offer to restore our South Florida environment.

Rob’s background is in plant sciences and landscape architecture.  He has been involved with FNPS for over 15 years, including with the landscape awards committee. He is a registered landscape architect with the South Florida Water Management District, working on the regulation of development issues.  Rob’s main work interest is the creation and restoration of freshwater and coastal wetlands, but he is excited by the opportunities presented by environmental art and green architecture.


Date: Saturday, July 19, 2008 Annual Evening Yard Visit & Social Meeting- in place of the meeting at Fairchild.
Time: 6 - 8 p.m.  Approximate schedule: 6:30 - guided yard tour, 7:15 (or earlier) - eat dinner, followed by the plant raffle.

Who's invited: FNPS members and their families and invited guests.
Where: Members’ home in the Redland. For details please see the printed newsletter.
Bring: Potluck  dish (main, side/salad, dessert), lawn chairs or blanket to sit on, bug repellant if you are bothered by mosquitoes.  Drinks, plates, etc. will be furnished.  Bring an umbrella if it looks like rain (the covered chickee is not huge, but the event is rain or shine).

Description: Eight years ago the members’ property was bare of plantings.  Now a 1/4-acre native planting complements a "Cracker style" house on 5 acres in the Redland (next to a 7 1/2 acre pineland to the west).  There are over 150 native species around a 40,000 gallon water feature  (waterfall, 2 ponds and a 16' grotto) and a chickee hut built by the Miccosukee.  The pond and grotto are home to hundreds of tropical fish and some Rainbow bass.  The plantings have matured and filled in since the yard visit two years ago and a new planting has been added along  the west fence.  They have also added bromeliads around the pond to add color and a tropical feel.  Lori collects statuary of frogs and turtles which adorn the edges of the pond.  As former nursery owners, their landscape also includes hundreds of palms, both rare and common, with emphasis on Thrinax/ Coccothrinax and Copernecia.  Flowering trees are also mixed in.


Tuesday, June 24, 2008, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public. Refreshments begin at 7:15; merchandise sales are before and after the program (cash/checks only).

"Growing Great Natives from A to Xeriscape"
- Jeff Wasielewski, Horticultural Consultant

Jeff will cover everything you need to know to turn your yard into a lush garden paradise. Topics will include South Florida soils, plant selection, planting, benefits of mulching, watering, pest control and low maintenance yards. Jeff is a certified arborist and horticultural consultant.  You can visit his website at www.southfloridahorticulture.com or read his monthly column in Family magazine.  He has his own garden paradise with a mix of natives and exotics, and a water feature.  Jeff has been working with and studying plants for 16 years.  He has a degree in horticulture from MDC and a Master's in Education from UM.  He teaches horticulture at Fairchild and MDC and has presented numerous programs for chapter meetings and Native Plant Day.  His full time job is as a reading coach for Miami-Dade Public Schools.  Jeff is the proud father of a seven year old junior horticulturist, Samantha. He was drawn to horticulture in 1992 after Hurricane Andrew -- he loved being outside to clean up!


Tuesday, May 27, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

“Place Names in South Florida’s National Parks” - Larry Perez, National Park Service.

Larry Perez, author of Words on the Wilderness: A History of Place Names in South Florida’s National Parks, will share some of the colorful stories in the history of the Everglades, Biscayne and Dry Tortugas National Parks and Big Cypress National Preserve.   In addition to the natural beauty of the parks, the parks also preserve a deep cultural history reflected in place names.  Larry’s book delves into the origin of names for places like Chatham Bend, Gannet Strand, Ochopee, Cape Sable and Dildo Key.  

Larry is a lifelong resident of Miami and a long-time interpreter and ranger in Miami-Dade Parks and the National Park Service (presently at Everglades National Park).  He is a graduate of Florida International University (and current graduate student), the writer and producer of Everglades by Car: A Narrated Audio Tour of Everglades National Park, and  author of the Journal of Florida’s Watchable Wildlife: Reptiles and Amphibians, and many articles. Learn more at www.WordsOnTheWilderness.com.


Tuesday, April 22, 2008, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.  (Note: the 4th Tuesday, not the last) Preceded by a tram tour of FTBG (details below).

"Lichens and the Native Flora of Subtropical Florida" - Rick Seavey

Lichens have never been systematically studied in subtropical South Florida.  This became painfully obvious to Rick and Jean Seavey when they purchased Ernie Brodo’s beautiful book, “Lichens of North America” and found very few of our lichens included.  This began their goal of creating an accurate lichen checklist for subtropical Florida.  It seemed reasonable to assume that, as with plants, subtropical Florida is home to many unique and rare lichen species.  Four years into their study, Rick is going to give us a progress report, including photographs of interesting species.  He will emphasize lichens that live on native flora.  To date they have identified 280 species and attracted recognition and continuing interest from New York Botanical Garden and Harvard’s Farlow Herbarium.

Rick and Jean are naturalists who, in collaboration with Everglades National Park, have been studying South Florida’s natural world for over 20 years.  In addition to numerous projects they currently produce nine nature oriented field guides.  Much of this work is described on their website, www.seaveyfieldguides.com .

Refreshments begin at 7:15; merchandise sales are before and after the program (cash/checks only).  Check out our brand new chapter t-shirts and denim shirts.

Tram tour before the April meeting.  Enjoy a quiet, early-evening view of the garden on FTBG's 70-seat tram.  This free 40-minute ride is open to FNPS members and their guests. Please see newsletter for details.


Tuesday, March 25, 2008, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

“Give Peas a Chance…Fabaceae (Pea Family) in South Florida”  -  Steven W. Woodmansee, Biologist

There are many different types of legumes (Fabaceae or pea family) found in South Florida.   It is South Florida’s fourth largest plant family with almost 90 native representatives (and over 100 naturalized exotic representatives).  The legume family is fairly easy to discern from other plant families, and Steve will discuss the characteristics that distinguish or unite different groups of this fascinating plant family.  The program will include a wide range of colorful photographs of legumes.  Steve is a biologist, formerly with The Institute for Regional Conservation, leader of the Native Plant Workshop, past-president of the Dade Chapter FNPS, frequent field trip leader and eternally the person in the chapter to answer plant questions.


Tuesday, February 26, 2008, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

"Rare Plants of Everglades National Park" - Jimi Sadle, National Park Service, Everglades National Park

Jimi Sadle will present current information on rare native plant populations in Everglades National Park.  He will discuss factors that contribute to rarity in ENP using examples of temperate, tropical and endemic plant species of South Florida.

Jimi is a Florida native who moved to South Florida at the turn of the century. He has conducted field work in many of South Florida’s natural areas while working with the Institute for Regional Conservation and the National Park Service. He is currently park botanist at Everglades National Park and lives in Homestead.


Tuesday, January 22, 2008, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

“What Gives Florida Tropical Woods Their Beautiful Colors and Grains?”  Dr. Jack B. Fisher, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden.

Dr. Fisher will describe how tropical woods grow and illustrate how variations in wood growth and the chemicals deposited in wood produce distinctive grains and color.  Wood samples will be on display courtesy of Ed McSweeny.  Both Jack and Ed are members of FNPS and the South Florida Woodturners Guild.  Dr. Fisher is Senior Research Scientist at the Center for Tropical Plant Conservation, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden.  He has performed research on tropical plant structure and function at Fairchild for 35 years, teaches as an adjunct at UM and FIU and is a member of the International Society of Wood Anatomists.


Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road. Free and open to the public.

"Rehydration of the Deering Estate’s Cutler Creek: Reconnecting the Everglades to the bay and monitoring the vegetation’s response." -- Craig Grossenbacher, Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management, and Jennifer Possley, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden.

At one time, a finger glade filled with freshwater vegetation carried water from the Everglades to Biscayne Bay, less than a mile apart. Since the 1950s, when flood control canals were constructed, the slough has been disconnected from its historic fresh water source. But a multi-agency rehydration project will soon reconnect the slough to provide environmental benefits. Craig Grossenbacher will give an overview of the project, including its status from the perspective of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. Jennifer Possley will describe the program created in 2003 to monitor the vegetation response and present baseline data with emphasis on ferns. See www.deeringestate.com/park/otherprojects.html for an introduction and photos. Then come on the December 16 field trip!

Craig has been with DERM 20 years and oversees the environmental planning section. He was involved with the rehydration project even before it became a component of CERP. Jennifer is a Field Biologist for the Center for Tropical Plant Conservation at Fairchild, where she monitors rare plants. She came to Florida from Michigan to remove melaleuca in Big Cypress, studied at UF’s Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants.


Tuesday, October 23, 2007, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.   4th Tuesday - not the last!

Making and Using Compost in Your Florida Garden - Dr. George Fitzpatrick, University of Florida

Dr. Fitzpatrick will describe the factors that influence the decomposition of organic matter and will show examples of different types and styles of small scale backyard composting systems.  He will explain and show examples of ways that compost can be used to enhance the plant rooting environment.

You will recognize our speaker from his informative and entertaining presentations at Native Plant Day as well as a previous meeting program on pruning.  He is a Professor of Environmental Horticulture for UF and a member of the Florida State Horticultural Society, the American Society of Horticultural Science, the Society of Economic Botany, and the International Society of Arboriculture. 


Tuesday, September 25, 2007, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.  

Comes the Sea - How Global Warming will change South Florida.  Dr. Harold R. Wanless, Professor and Chair, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Miami

Florida is extremely low lying and is very vulnerable to even small changes in sea level.  The nine inches of relative sea level rise over the past 75 years has initiated dramatic changes in our coastal wetlands and destabilized our sandy coastlines.  The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has forecast an additional global sea rise of about 1-2 feet for the coming century.  This projection is most certainly dangerously overly conservative because climate and sea level projection models do not incorporate the true stepped nature of climate and sea level change and because projections do not include the recent acceleration in arctic melting observed.  A two foot rise in sea level will be challenging of south Florida. Any rise greater than two feet in the coming century will be catastrophic for south Florida and challenge the area’s inhabitability.

In addition to Professor and Department Chair at UM, Dr. Wanless is a Fellow in the Geological Society of America and member of Society of Sedimentary Geology.


Tuesday, June 26, 2007, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Garden House, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.  

Preceded by a tram tour at FTBG (details below).

“Poisonous and Edible Wild Natives” - Roger Hammer, Senior Interpretive Naturalist, Miami-Dade Parks Dept.

Many native plants are edible, and some are edible, but not “eatable.”  Still others can make a person ill, while a few can have deadly consequences if eaten.  Roger’s presentation will focus on those native plants in southern Florida that can be safely eaten, and those that should be avoided.

Roger is Senior Interpretive Naturalist for Miami-Dade Parks Department, and Manager of Castellow Hammock Nature Center since 1977.  He is a native Floridian from Cocoa Beach and has lived in Homestead since 1969.  He is the author of many articles and three books on South Florida: Everglades Wildflowers (2002), Florida Keys Wildflowers (2004), and Exploring Everglades National Park And The Surrounding Area (2004).  Roger is a member of FNPS and was recipient of the Dade Chapter’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas Award in 1982 for “outstanding, consistent, and constant service in the areas of education, research, promotion, and preservation of native plants.”  He also received the FNPS Green Palmetto Award for education in 2003.

This meeting will be held in the Garden House, the large building next to our usual meeting place (go in the usual gate).  Refreshments are available for early arrivals at 7:15.  Additions to the refreshment table and raffle plant donations are always welcome.  (Please check your plants for lobate lac scale.)  If you signed up to bring refreshments and have questions, please call Patty Harris at 305-262-3763.  Merchandise is available for sale before and after the program (cash and checks only).

Tram tour before the June meeting.  Come early to the June meeting and enjoy a quiet, early-evening view of the garden on FTBG’s 70-seat tram.  This free 40-minute ride is open to Florida Native Plant Society members and their guests.  Be at the Garden House (where the meeting will be held) by 6 pmPlease RSVP to Lynka Woodbury at 305-667-1651x3427 (leave a short message with your name and the number of people). If you don’t RSVP, it is “as available,” but there should be plenty of room.  The tram cannot go in bad weather.


Tuesday, April 24, 2007, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

Propagating Native Plants from Seed – Rob Campbell, Grower, Signature Trees and Palms.

Isn’t it a shame that some those seeds dropping off your native plants aren’t becoming new plants in your own or friends’ yards or on our raffle table?  Learn how to propagate your own plants from seed and successfully grow them up to planting size — from wildflowers to trees.  Rob Campbell is the grower for Signature Trees and Palms in the Redland.  He has been growing plants professionally for over 30 years and has been a member of the Dade Chapter FNPS since its beginnings.  Don’t miss Rob’s entertaining tales and informative insights into how nature works!  Bring your questions and seeds to share.


Tuesday, March 27, 2007 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

Green Thumb Certified – Working with Nurseries to Stop Invasives -- Alison Higgins, Land Conservation Manager, The Nature Conservancy, The Florida Keys. 

Most nursery and home owners are unfamiliar with the invasive exotic plants of our region and the problems they cause.  The Educational Committee of the Florida Keys Invasive Exotic Task Force is helping change that.  A collaborative partnership between South Florida Water Management District, The Nature Conservancy, Monroe County Extension and countless other partners, "Green Thumb Certified" provides recognition to plant nurseries in the Keys that pledge not to sell invasive exotics and also push "AlterNatives" (native plants that fill the same form and function) and provide customers with Keys-friendly fertilizers, mulch and irrigation options.  It is hoped that like-minded groups will continue this effort in other areas.  Read more about it at  www.KeysGreenThumb.net!


Tuesday, February 27, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

“Everglades Restoration: Are We There Yet?” – Dr. Thomas Van Lent, the Everglades Foundation.   

Dr. Van Lent will present a science-based look (tailored for a non-scientist audience) at the historical Everglades, the damage inflicted by flood-control projects, and how a "restored" Everglades might look, along with an environmentalist perspective on how restoration is progressing.  His talk will also provide a behind-the-scenes look at the process, and a prognosis for success.  Dr. Van Lent is a Senior Scientist with the Everglades Foundation and member of the American Geophysical Union.  The Everglades Foundation, Inc. (www.evergladesfoundation.org) is a not-for-profit organization working “to protect the Everglades through environmental leadership, scientific expertise, and policy experience."  See the Website for an array of facts and nice photos.


Tuesday, January 23, 2007, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.  (4th not last Tuesday)

"Florida's Native Bromeliads" – Ken Marks, Florida Director of the Bromeliad Society International.

Ken Marks will show all of the Florida-native bromeliads as seen in the wild in a PowerPoint presentation and discuss their identification.  He will also be happy to answer questions about propagation of these species at home.  He may be able to bring a few live specimens to show as well, but any additions from the group are welcome.

When Mr. Marks moved to Broward County from Chicago 11 years ago, he soon learned that plant obsessions of South Floridians could include more than orchids.  His recent obsession to locate and photograph all of the native bromeliads of Florida started early this year and resulted in tonight's presentation and a two-part article in the Journal of the Bromeliad Society.  In addition to growing bromeliads for his own garden, he is past President of the Boca Raton Bromeliad Society and currently both a Florida Director and Webmaster for the Bromeliad Society International.


Tuesday, November 28, 2006, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public.

"Forensic Botany" – David Hall, Ph.D., Environmental and Forensic Consultant

Forensic Botany is the analysis of plant material in both civil and criminal law enforcement.  Plant evidence can be used to destroy an alibi, help determine time since death, put a suspect at a crime scene, or tell where someone or something has been.  Dr. Hall will give examples of cases which demonstrate how plants can be valuable tools used to help put suspects behind bars.

Dr. Hall owns and operates an environmental and forensic consulting firm in Gainesville and is a recognized expert in forensics and plant identification.  He was Director of the Plant Identification and Information Services at the University of Florida and helped write wetland jurisdictional rules for Florida and Federal wetland plant list and procedures.  He has provided botanical expertise for investigations and training by the FBI, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Florida Water Management Districts and Department of Environmental Protection and others.


Tuesday, October 24, 2006, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  Free and open to the public. (4th Tuesday, not the last)

“New Natives” – David McLean, horticulture and landscape design professor

Our speaker will discuss a variety of topics related to landscaping, including growing Florida natives outside their historical range; native cultivars and why you might want to use them (natives which have been hybridized to have a specific size, shape, behavior, color) and what he calls "Not soon to be natives" (dealing with some infamous exotics).

Mr. McLean retired in 2003 from the Horticulture Program at Broward Community College Horticulture, where he taught about many facets of horticulture and landscaping.  He was designer and curator of the Medicinal Garden at Nova Southeastern University.  He operates Trinity Churchside Garden in Fort. Lauderdale, where he gives programs, and also owns Living Systems Consulting and Landscape/Design.


Tuesday, September 26, 2006, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  The meeting is free and open to the public.

'What does northern Australian eucalypt biology suggest about Dade County pine?'  Dr. David P. Janos, Associate Professor, Department of Biology, University of Miami

Many of us have participated in replanting Dade county pine seedlings in natural areas or even in our own yards, and we know that the success of our efforts is varied.  Why might this happen?  Strictly speaking, most plants in nature don't have only roots -- they have 'mycorrhizas' which are absorptive organs formed by the combination of beneficial fungi and plant fine rootlets.  Mycorrhizas are the front line between plants and soils, and they usually assist plants to acquire mineral nutrients.  In this talk, Dr. Janos will introduce the two most common types of mycorrhizas of trees, and will draw a parallel between soil constraints on a species of eucalypt in Australia's Northern Territory and difficulties in establishing seedlings of Miami's Dade County pine.


Tuesday, July 26, 2006   6:30-9 p.m.  Annual evening yard visit and social (not at Fairchild).

A member's home in Cutler Ridge.  This lush yard has a mixture of native and exotic plants.  A patio will offer shelter if it rains while we enjoy our potluck dinner.  Dress appropriately for the heat and possible mosquitoes (bring repellant just in case).  We will have the plant raffle as usual, so bring your donations and dollars!  (Please check your plants for lobate lac scale.)


Tuesday, June 27, 2006, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road The meeting is free and open to the public.

"Aquatic and Wetland Wildflowers of Southern Florida" – Chuck McCartney.

You probably think of pinelands, prairies and roadsides when you think or wildflowers. But there are plenty more in ponds, canals and other bodies of water. Chuck will show us 38 species of native wildflowers, focusing primarily on aquatic species but dealing with some common species of adjacent wetland areas as well.

Chuck describes himself as a native wildflower enthusiast and amateur photographer, but we know him a favorite program presenter and one who satisfies our hunger for information and cheap cookies on field trips.  He is a native Dade Countian who grew up in Homestead, is a former editor for the American Orchid Society and now is a copy editor for The Miami Herald.  He is a frequent and popular speaker at plant societies and nature groups, spreading the gospel of native orchids and wildflowers (and a few non-native orchids as well).


Tuesday, May 23, 2006, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road  The meeting is free and open to the public. (Fourth Tuesday, not the last.)

"Pruning Landscape Trees for Tree Health and Safety" --

George Fitzpatrick, Professor of Environmental Horticulture, University of Florida.

Just in time for pre- and post-hurricane season tree care, this program will focus on the objectives for landscape tree pruning, with emphasis on tree health and safety.  The care and correct use of basic pruning equipment will be demonstrated, and the three major types of pruning cuts, reduction cuts, removal cuts and heading cuts will be illustrated.  Even if you are not going to prune your own trees, learning the basics will help you discuss work to be done when you hire a professional. Dr. Fitzpatrick  teaches at UF's Agriculture Research and Education Centers in Ft. Lauderdale and Homestead and has presented "Training and Pruning of Young Trees" several times at Native Plant Day to appreciative audiences. 

We will also have our brief Annual Meeting of the Dade Chapter where we will elect new chapter board members.


Tuesday, April 25, 2006, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road. The meeting is free and open to the public.

“South Florida Plants and Their Beneficial Fungi (mycorrhizae)” -- Jack B. Fisher, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

Most land plants have a close association with fungi in their roots.  In wild plants and some crops, fungi can help the plant take up nutrients and water, protect the roots from fungi that cause disease, and protect from metal toxicity.  Some plants must have mycorrhizae to grow (orchid seedlings, some fern gametophytes) or to flourish in the wild (most plants).  Dr. Fisher will describe and illustrate various kinds of local mycorrhizae fungi in the roots of our native plants.  Results of greenhouse experiments with seedlings indicate that most native plants benefit from mycorrhizae when growing in our nutrient poor native soils, but are not dependent upon the fungi since fertilizer is equally effective in promoting growth. Whether you want to learn about what can make your own plants thrive or just curious about how plants work, this is an interesting topic.

Dr. Fisher is Senior Research Scientist and Administrator of Graduate Studies at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden and a Florida Native Plant Society member.


Tuesday, March 28, 2006, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road The meeting is free and open to the public.

"Barking Up The Right Tree" -- Chris Migliaccio, Professor of Ecology and Environmental Sciences at Miami Dade College.

Tired of botanizing with binoculars because the leaves are out of reach?  This month's meeting will focus on identification of South Florida's native trees by their bark.  Test your own field skills as you participate in a game show-type multimedia presentation that promises to be educational and entertaining.  Long time FNPS member Chris Migliaccio is Professor of Ecology  Environmental Sciences at the MDC Wolfson Campus, a published nature photographer, and curator of lots of bark in his own garden.


Tuesday, February 28, 2006, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road. The meeting is free and open to the public.

CERP: Scope, Scale, and Science Involved in the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan – Dr. Len Scinto, Assistant Research Scientist, Southeast Environmental Research Center, FIU.

Dr. Scinto's research focus is the biogeochemistry of freshwater wetlands.  His work revolves around the issues of transport and cycling of chemical elements, notably anthropogenic nutrients, between the living and non-living compartments of wetland ecosystems.  Dr. Scinto will give a brief introduction to the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP).  Costing an estimated $8.5 billion and encompassing over 18,000 square miles, CERP is unique in scale and complexity and is the largest environmental restoration project ever conducted.  The plan involves numerous, innovative applications of restoration science, land and water management, and environmental monitoring.  Dr. Scinto will discuss examples of restoration science he is involved with, including the development and monitoring of Stormwater Treatment Areas and the Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment Area.  (Don't worry – this will be science in layman's terms.)


Tuesday, January 24, 2006, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road (4th Tuesday, not the last!) The meeting is free and open to the public.

"Cat Colonies and Feral Cats in Natural Areas."  Dan Castillo and Ricardo Zambrano, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

The problem of feral cats in natural areas is a difficult issue, with concerns about the impact of cats on wildlife and the difficulty of keeping cat colonies in check.  Dan Castillo will discuss the effectiveness of trap, neuter, and release programs in reducing the number of feral and unwanted cats in public lands, a topic he studied for his Master's thesis at FIU.  Ricardo Zambrano will speak about feral cat predation on wildlife and FFWCC's policy on feral and free-ranging cats.  Dan is Biological Scientist III with the FFWCC.  He is in charge of the Southern Glades Wildlife and Environmental Area (WEA) and Frog Pond Wildlife Management Area (WMA).  Ricardo Zambrano is Biological Scientist IV with the FFWCC and the South Region's Non-Game Biologist and lead point of contact on feral cat issues.


Tuesday, November 22, 2005, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Corbin Building, 10901 Old Cutler Road (4th Tuesday, not the last!) The meeting is free and open to the public.

"Becoming an Environmental Advocate" – Cynthia Guerra, Executive Director, Tropical Audubon Society

Miami-Dade County is a dynamic place – with complex regulatory structures, an ever-changing political scene and an array of exceptional natural resources that need protection, it can be a challenge for citizens to know how to be involved in the decisions that affect our environment.  Prior to her current position with the Tropical Audubon Society, Ms. Guerra gained experience as a regulator with Miami-Dade DERM.  That background, coupled with an understanding of county, regional, state and federal authorities, aids in her current conservation work.  Ms. Guerra will review some of the basic techniques that help residents find their voice and become advocates for habitat and wildlife.

Early arrivals can snack before the meeting at 7:15.  Additions to the refreshment table and raffle plant donations are always welcome.  (Please check your plants for lobate lac scale.)  If you signed up to bring refreshments and have questions, please call Patty Harris at 305-262-3763.


Cancelled due to Hurricane Wilma. We are hoping to reschedule this presentation for sometime in 2006: Tuesday, October 25, 2005, 7:30 pm. at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden's "Garden House", 10901 Old Cutler Road. The meeting is free and open to the public.

Forensic Botany Presentation David Hall, Ph.D., Environmental and Forensic Consultant

Forensic Botany is the analysis of plant material in both civil and criminal law enforcement.  Plant evidence can be used to destroy an alibi, help determine time since death, put a suspect at a crime scene, or tell where someone or something has been.  Dr. Hall will give examples of cases which demonstrate how plants can be valuable tools used to help put suspects behind bars. Dr. Hall owns and operates an environmental and forensic consulting firm in Gainesville and is a recognized expert in forensics and plant identification. 


Tuesday, September 27, 2005, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. The meeting is free and open to the public.

'Introduction to Plant Families' -- Gwen Burzycki, Miami-Dade Dept. of Environmental Resources Management

Have you ever wondered how the expert botanists figure out a name for that unidentified 'dingleweed' you found on a field trip?  Believe it or not, you don't have to memorize all 4,000 Florida plant species.  There is a system of organization to plant identification that makes identification of an unknown easier than you think.  Gwen will review some of the terms you will need to understand identification keys and provide some examples of common plant families that are easy to recognize.  Gwen is an Environmental Resources Project Supervisor with DERM, member of FNPS and an enthusiastic plant aficionado.  (Bonus offer!  Apply what you will learn in Gwen’s yard on October 29.  See the newsletter for more info.)


Tuesday, July 26, 2005.  Annual evening yard visit and social (not at Fairchild).

A member's home near The Falls.  Attractive front-yard landscaping leads to a lake-side back yard, all with a mixture of native and exotic plants.  A screened patio will offer shelter from mosquitoes and rain while we enjoy our potluck dinner.  The owners will give tours at 6:45 and 7:15, and we'll enjoy dinner after that.  Dress appropriately for the heat and possible mosquitoes (bring repellant just in case).  We will have the plant raffle as usual, so bring your donations and dollars.  Please check your plants for lobate lac scale.


Tuesday, June 28, 2005, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. The meeting is free and open to the public.

"Flora Cubana" – Dr. Scott Zona, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden.

Dr. Zona will share fascinating images of Cuba's native flora from his many expeditions to Cuba.  He will highlight some of the remarkable aspects of Cuban plant life.  Scott has been Fairchild's Palm Biologist since 1993.  Although he grew up in Boynton Beach, his field work has taken him to the Caribbean, Central America, Indonesia and a host of points in between.  He is interested in all aspects of plant diversity, especially the identification, classification and distribution of palms.  He has more than 85 publications, both scientific and popular, on tropical plants.


Tuesday, May 24, 2005, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. (The forth Tuesday, not the last!) The meeting is free and open to the public.

"Miami-Dade's Endangered Lands: Fifteen Years Safeguarding Our Natural Areas" – Christina M. Casado-Acorn, Miami-Dade DERM

The Miami-Dade County Environmentally Endangered Lands (EEL) Program has worked to acquire and restore some of the precious few natural areas remaining in our community and to preserve them for the enjoyment of future generations.  In the last fifteen years the program has restored pinelands and hammocks affected by Hurricane Andrew, studied and monitored their rare and imperiled plant and animal species, and provided places for nature lovers to enjoy quiet visits to natural areas rapidly being urbanized.  We will hear about the history of the EEL Program, some of the resident rare plant species that compelled EEL to acquire these sites, and future plans.  Christina is Environmental Resource Project Supervisor for the EEL Program.

We will also have our brief but important Annual Chapter Meeting to elect the 2005-2006 Board of Directors.


Tuesday, April 26, 2005, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. The meeting is free and open to the public.

Gardening for Pollinators -- Dr. Suzanne Koptur, Professor of Botany, Florida International University.

The home garden provides a welcome respite for pollinators moving between natural habitat patches in the ever-more urbanized landscape.  Suzanne will discuss the importance of our gardens to these insects and the benefits of native plants in this role.  Dr. Koptur is a botanist who loves insects and other animals, and for the last twenty years has been studying the interactions of South Florida native plants with herbivores and pollinators.  She also has a growing interest in making and using ecological schoolyards in our community and is working on trying to bring more native wildflowers into cultivation for gardening in schoolyards and on roadsides.

Also, the recipients of the chapter's George Avery science fair awards for 2005 will give short presentations on their projects.


Tuesday, March 22, 2005, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. The 4th not the last Tuesday!  The meeting is free and open to the public.

Florida Friendly Landscaping and the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods Program -- Marguerite Beckford, Miami-Dade Extension Agent.

The Florida Yards and Neighborhoods (FYN) program enlists homeowners, previously identified through UF research as contributing to the decimation of Florida's natural resources through inappropriate landscape practices, to help protect these natural resources.  FYN emphasizes not only the use of native plants but also "Florida-Friendly" landscape principles such as nutrient recycling, reducing storm-water run-off, using slow-release fertilizers and least-toxic pesticides.  The Certified Yard Program is an educational outreach tool used to spread the message of sustainable landscaping among Miami-Dade residents.  Set a good example for your neighborhood -- find out how you can get your own yard certified.


Tuesday, February 22, 2005, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  The meeting is free and open to the public.

"South Florida's Morning-Glories and Their Relatives" – Roger Hammer, Senior Interpretive Naturalist, Miami-Dade Parks.

Roger will present a photographic review of the native and naturalized morning glory species with discussion of their historic uses as food, medicines and hallucinogens and in folklore and religious ceremonies, as well as their uses in the home landscape. "Father Nature" is the naturalist for Castellow Hammock Nature Center, author of two books, Everglades Wildflowers and Florida Keys Wildflowers, a frequent lecturer and writer for many publications, and member of FNPS.


Tuesday, February 22, 2005, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  The meeting is free and open to the public.

"South Florida's Morning-Glories and Their Relatives" – Roger Hammer, Senior Interpretive Naturalist, Miami-Dade Parks.

Roger will present a photographic review of the native and naturalized morning glory species with discussion of their historic uses as food, medicines and hallucinogens and in folklore and religious ceremonies, as well as their uses in the home landscape. "Father Nature" is the naturalist for Castellow Hammock Nature Center, author of two books, Everglades Wildflowers and Florida Keys Wildflowers, a frequent lecturer and writer for many publications, and member of FNPS.


Tuesday, January 25, 2005, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden 10901 Old Cutler Road.  The meeting is free and open to the public.

"Propagation: Not Just Seeds" Rob Campbell, native plant grower.

The plant world is full of surprises.  Among them is the surprising variety of ways that plants can be propagated.  Rob Campbell, grower for Plant Creations Nursery, will discuss how the adaptations of plants can be used to our advantage when propagating.  The very adaptations that help plants survive can be used to encourage greater vigor.  Alternative ways of producing plants asexually, both common and uncommon, will be shown.  Rob has been a grower of native plants for 28 years and a member of FNPS from the beginning of the chapter.


Tuesday, November 23, 2004, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  (the 4th Tuesday, not the last!) The meeting is free and open to the public.

"Disposable Pets, Unwanted Giants: Pythons in Everglades National Park" –  Skip Snow, Everglades National Park.

The status of plants and animals -- native and exotic -- in the Everglades are all of concern in the management of the park's resources.  Skip Snow, Wildlife Biologist at ENP, will tell us about one particularly large challenge in the control of exotic animals.  In addition to figuring out how to keep some species out of the park (pythons), Skip has also worked to put some species back into the park (eastern bluebirds, brown-headed nuthatches and wild turkeys). He has worked at Everglades National Park since 1988 and previously worked for the National Park Service in Colorado, at Mount Rainier National Park, and Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota.


Tuesday, October 26, 2004, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  The meeting is free and open to the public.

"Natives For Your Neighborhood: an innovative conservation tool for South Florida" - George Gann.

Based on more than a decade of intensive research, The Institute for Regional Conservation (IRC) will soon launch Natives For Your Neighborhood, an innovative web application that promotes the use of native plants within their historical ranges in order to increase success of native plant projects and maximize conservation benefits.  IRC Executive Director, George Gann, will describe the origins of the project, the research that backs it up, and its usefulness to homeowners, businesses, governmental agencies and utilities.  Check out a test version of the site before the meeting by visiting IRC's website at www.regionalconservation.org and clicking on "Natives For Your Neighborhood!" 


Tuesday, September 28, 2004, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. The meeting is free and open to the public.

"Those Wacky Orchids ... And How Our Native Species Fit In" -- Chuck McCartney.

The orchid family, with more than 25,000 species, is the most diverse of the plant families, with representatives found in every terrestrial environmental niche except Arctic/Antarctic ice and absolute deserts. The plants and flowers come in a dizzying array of sizes, shapes and colors. Native orchid enthusiast Chuck McCartney will give us an overview of this fascinating plant family, then show how some of our 60 or so native species in South Florida fit in with the rest of the family. Chuck, a South Florida native species himself, is former editor of the American Orchid Society's publications and writes and lectures frequently on native orchid and wildflower topics.


There is no August meeting or field trip, but there is an Everglades workday.


Tuesday, July 27, 2004.  Annual evening yard visit and social (not at Fairchild!).

Our annual yard visit meeting is open to FNPS members and their guests.  Please join so that you can enjoy all of the chapter's activities!

We will visit a home in South Miami planting in natives over the last 40 years.  The yard is unique in that nary a single blade of lawn exists. This yard is an excellent example of energy efficiency and relatively low maintenance.  It is an oasis for bird and wildlife, and the admiration of its owners as well as neighbors.

We will tour the yard, eat, socialize and have our plant raffle as usual (please check for lobate lac scale).  In case of inclement weather, there is a large covered patio. Come enjoy!


Tuesday, June 22, 2004, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"Interactions between herbivory and pollination in the butterfly pea, Centrosema virginiana." –  Dr. Yuria Cardel

Dr. Cardel will describe her studies of interactions between herbivory and pollination in one of our most beautiful native flowering plants, the butterfly pea (Centrosema virginianum).  The large showy flowers are eaten by various insects, affecting the their appearance and attractiveness to pollinators.  The leaves of these pine rockland perennial vines are also eaten by a variety of insects, which remove substantial amounts of leaf tissue.  Leaf area and floral tissue lost to herbivory can indirectly or directly affect pollination.  Yuria conducted field and greenhouse experiments to determine the effects of herbivory on various floral characters.  How do these different kinds of herbivory affect the butterfly pea and its pollination?  Come find out!

Yuria received her PhD in April, 2004, from FIU.  She is a native of Mexico and received her B.S. from Universidad de Puebla, where her senior thesis work on the ponytail tree (Beaucarnea) resulted in a publication in Conservation Biology.  She came to the US to work with Suzanne Koptur.


Tuesday, May 25, 2004, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. 

"Native Plant Pests: The Bad and the Ugly" – Adrian Hunsberger, UF/ Miami-Dade County Extension.

Even native plants are susceptible to plant pests.  Learn which insects are true pests, which ones need to be controlled, and how to manage them with least-toxic methods based on research.  Updates on recent, serious pests (such as lobate lac scale) will also be discussed.

Adrian is the Urban Horticulture Agent and resident entomologist for the University of Florida / Miami-Dade County Extension.  and writes a weekly gardening column in the Sunday edition of The Miami Herald as well as for smaller newspapers.

We will also have our very brief but important annual chapter meeting.  Items of business include voting on a proposed amendment, as described in the April Tillandsia, to the bylaws and the election of officers. 


Tuesday, April  27,2004, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"Florida Keys Wildflowers." Speaker: Roger Hammer.

Roger Hammer, author of Everglades Wildflowers and the recently-released  (or soon to be!) book, Florida Keys Wildflowers, will present a slide-lecture on the wildflowers, trees, shrubs and woody vines of the enchanting Florida Keys.  His talk will include both common and critically imperiled species, as well as name derivations, bird and butterfly attracting attributes, uses for food or medicines, and other interesting facts about the native plants of the Florida Keys.  If the books are not available in time for this meeting, we'll arrange to have signed books at a later time.

Roger is a Senior Interpretive Naturalist for Miami-Dade Parks Department, Director of Castellow Hammock Nature Center, part-time instructor at Fairchild Tropical Garden, lecturer and walk leader all over South Florida, board member of Tropical Audubon Society,  member of FNPS and popular contributor to Tillandsia and The Palmetto – to name just a few of his accomplishments and contributions on behalf of South Florida's native plants and environment.


Tuesday, March 23, 2004, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  (4th Tuesday, not the last!)

"Carnivorous Plants of Florida and Beyond" -- Clyde Bramblett.

Carnivorous plants are common in North Florida but we see only a few species in our immediate area. Clyde will introduce us to this fascinating group of plants including species throughout the U.S., focusing mostly on Florida species, some of which we will see on our field trip to Jonathan Dickinson State Park in April. Clyde's initial plant interest was in orchids, but a desire to learn more about a group of plants that fewer people were involved in led him to the carnivorous plants more than 30 years ago.


Tuesday, February 24, 2004, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"South Florida Spiders"  -- Bob Kelley.

Most nature lovers are probably first attracted to birds and butterflies.  Bob Kelley, our chapter Vice President, was interested in spiders 20 years before he also took up birds.  Bob will show slides and bring books that you might want to get for yourself – and some "surprises", which he claims are not live spiders.


Tuesday, January 27, 2004, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"The Hole in the Donut -- Seven Years of Wetland Restoration in Everglades National Park"  -- Dr. Michael R. Norland, Everglades National Park.

Wetlands are being recreated on former farmland in Everglades National Park. When farming ceased, disturbed soils remained in place and the area rapidly became a dense forest of the exotic pest plant Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius).  To prevent further spread and create the best possible conditions for natural wetland vegetation, the park initiated a wetland restoration and mitigation project in 1996.  Existing vegetation and underlying disturbed soils have been removed in several sites, lowering the surface elevation, resulting in a longer hydroperiod that promotes colonization of native wetland plants by natural recruitment.  Dr. Norland has been Hole in the Donut Project Manager/Supervisory Soil Scientist at ENP since 1996.  Prior to this, he was a soil scientist with the former U.S. Bureau of Mines, developing restoration schemes for a variety of disturbed lands including mining-related Superfund sites.


Tuesday, November 25, 2003, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Early Everglades Naturalists and Gladesmen Guides.  Dr. Laura Ogden, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Florida International University.  Dr. Laura Ogden is an environmental anthropologist who investigates the process by which people invest natural landscapes with cultural significance.  Her current research is with gladesmen in the Florida Everglades, white settlers who traditionally supported themselves by alligator hunting and commercial fishing.  She also works with state and federal agencies involved in Everglades Restoration to develop social science research planning and public engagement strategies. She is co-author (with Glen Simmons) of the book Gladesman: Gator Hunters, Moonshiners and Skiffers and has been a U.S. EPA STAR Environmental Fellow.  Dr. Ogden will be discussing the participation of local residents in the process of transforming the Everglades from an "unknown" landscape to one known to science.


Tuesday, October 28, 2003, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Rufino Orsorio, author of the popular book, A Gardener's Guide to Florida's Native Plants, will show slides of South Florida wildflowers and discuss their cultivation.  Rufino is an avid gardener and amateur botanist who specializes in the cultivation of Florida native plants, especially the small shrubs and wildflowers.  Originally from Chicago, where he grew woodland and prairie plants, he has lived in Palm Beach County for 15 years and is a member of the Florida Native Plant Society.


Tuesday, September 23, 2003, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. (Fourth Tuesday, not the last)

Ethnobotany of the Saw Palmetto – Dr. Bradley C. Bennett, Associate Professor of Biology, Florida International University.

Saw palmetto (Serenoa repens), one of the most abundant plants in Florida, is a characteristic element of pine flatwoods, prairies, scrub, coastal dunes, and mesic hammocks.  The most common palm in the U.S., saw palmetto is found through much of the southeastern coastal plain but is most common in Florida.  Although once considered a bothersome rangeland weed, saw palmetto provides wildlife forage and an array of products for humans including fiber, wax, and medicines.  The dried fruits have been shipped to Europe since the 1700s.  Today the fruits are highly valued as a medicine to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).  Saw palmetto ranks among the top 10 botanicals in the U.S.  Fruit collecting is centered in Immakolee in southwestern Florida.  Dr. Bennett will tell us about many of the human and animal uses of this versatile plant.



Tuesday, July  22, 20037:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.  (Fourth Tuesday, not the last!)

Ecosystem Structure and Hydrologic Features of Bayhead Tree Islands in the Southern Everglades.  Tiffany Troxler Gann, Florida International University.

Tree islands are interesting and ecologically important ecosystems in the Everglades and are considered to be indicators of Everglades health.  Tiffany is investigating the effects of increased freshwater flow on bayhead tree islands, part of a restoration effort in the C-111 Basin.  She will discuss the ecology of bayhead tree islands and describe some of the ongoing research.  Tiffany began her doctorate at Florida International University in the Spring of 2002, where she also completed her master's degree in Biology in the Fall of 2001.  She has been working on Everglades bayhead tree islands since 1999.  Tiffany has been a member of the FNPS since 1996, and served on the State conference committee in 2000.


Tuesday, June  24, 2003: Annual summer solstice evening yard visit and social (not at Fairchild). See printed newsletter for details.

This year we will enjoy a native plant garden in South Miami.  This meeting is for FNPS members and their guests only.  It's a good reason to join!


Tuesday, May 27, 2003, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Native Lawn Weeds of South Florida - Steve Woodmansee, Institute for Regional Conservation

Some lawn weeds are actually interesting or pretty native plants which may even have value for wildlife. Steve will show slides of some of the common native lawn weeds and discuss their identification and characteristics. Please bring in examples from your yard and attach a blank label (any paper) to each with string or tape so we can write its name (you can write it if you already know). You don't need to know in advance if it's native. Try to bring a whole plant - roots and all - or at least a whole stem with all its leaves, flowers or fruit if present. Put it in a plastic bag if necessary.

Steve is a biologist with the Institute for Regional Conservation where he has worked for more than six years on research and preservation of South Florida's flora. He is co-author of The Rare Plants of South Florida: Their History, Conservation and Restoration (2002).


Tuesday, April 22, 2003 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. [4th not last Tuesday!]

Biological Control of the Mexican Bromeliad Weevil -- Dr. Ron Cave, University of Florida Indian River Research and Education Center.

The Mexican bromeliad weevil, Metamasius callizona, has now been in Florida for 14 years, devastating populations of native Tillandias in many South Florida natural areas. Seven of Florida's 16 native bromeliad species are currently threatened by this pest. The weevil is fast approaching the Everglades and Big Cypress areas, and has already been seen in the Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park. Dr. Cave will discuss his research to find biological controls for this weevil and for other pests that threaten native flora.

Dr. Cave is Assistant Professor of Entomology at the Indian River Research and Education Center in Ft. Pierce, where he researches the classical biological control of invasive arthropods in Florida and teaches entomology and pest management.


Tuesday, March 25, 2003 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"Florida's Wetlands" -- Dr. Martin Roessler, environmental consultant.

Dr. Roessler will explain the classification and the function of wetlands, and show examples of the plants used in defining wetland as well as examples of some of the most interesting and beautiful flora of swamps and marshes.

Marty received a Doctorate in Marine Sciences from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School. He has been involved in defining, evaluating and protecting wetlands for many years. Most of us know him best as our field trip leader and the one who knows the plants, as well as the author of the field trip reports in Tillandsia.

Carli Koshal and Lucia Goyen, winners of this year's George Avery Award at the South Florida Regional Science and Engineering Fair, will give a short presentation of their project. We will also have our Annual Meeting with election of the chapter board and vote on a proposed amendment to the bylaws to move the annual meeting to May.


Tuesday, February 25, 2003. 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"Miami-Dade Pine Rocklands" — Joe Maguire, Miami-Dade County Park and Recreation Department.

(...or "Snags R Us". ) Joe Maguire, supervisor of the Natural Areas Management Division, will present historical information on pine rocklands and discuss their condition after 12 years of restoration efforts. He will show some 1938 aerials, photos of old growth pine rocklands and pre-restoration photos from the 1980s and discuss pine biology, forest structure, fire and reforestation progress.


Tuesday, January 28, 2003, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"The Plant Life of Biscayne National Park" -- Keith A. Bradley, Research Biologist, The Institute for Regional Conservation.

Keith will talk about ongoing research the IRC is conducting in Biscayne National Park, doing a quantitative floristic survey of the park's flora. He will also discuss the history of botanical exploration in the park, the unique plant gems of the little islands in Biscayne Bay, new discoveries being made, and threats to the native vegetation. (This will prepare us for the upcoming excursion to Elliott Key, with Keith as leader.)


Tuesday, November 26, 2002. 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"Geologic perspectives of tree islands of the Everglades" -- Dr. Kevin Cunningham, geologist, US Geological Survey.

"A brief introduction to South Florida geology" — Gwladys Scott.

Dr. Cunningham will present his perspective on the geologic evolution of tree islands in the everglades wetlands and introduce recent geophysical research linked to understanding the origin of ridge and slough landscape in the everglades wetlands.

Kevin received his PhD in Geology from the University of Kansas and did post doctorate research at UM's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, and is currently a research hydrologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Miami and a member of DCFNPS.

Gwladys Scott, DCFNPS member and graduate geographer/geologist, will give a brief introduction to South Florida geology. Together, our speakers will set the stage for our upcoming field trip to tree islands of the everglades north of Tamiami Trail.


Tuesday, October 22, 2002 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. [Fourth Tuesday, not last]

"Conservation of South Florida’s Rare and Endangered Species", Joyce Maschinski, Conservation Ecologist, Fairchild Tropical Garden.

Joyce Maschinski comes to Fairchild from her position as Director of Research of The Arboretum at Flagstaff, Arizona. She will describe conservation science research at botanic gardens and give a general overview of Fairchild’s conservation program. She will also highlight some of the species in the current research program at Fairchild and her work elsewhere.

Before the main program, Juan Fernandez, biologist for the City of Miami’s Parks Department, will give a short presentation on the restoration of the hammock on Virginia Key. Don’t be late!


Tuesday, Sept 24, 2002 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"Rationale, Methodology and Interpretation of Host Range Tests in Weed Biological Control: Brazilian Peppertree Case Study" — Dr. James P. Cuda, University of Florida.

Dr. Cuda will speak about his research on biological control of Brazilian pepper and testing threatened and endangered native plant species as part of the risk assessment process. He is an assistant professor in the Entomology and Nematology Department at the University of Florida, Gainesville, and a consultant to the University's Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants. His research deals with biological control of aquatic and terrestrial weeds, including foreign exploration, host specificity testing, and release/evaluation of promising natural enemies of exotic weeds that have invaded Florida and threaten the southeastern United States. He is developing an extension program on biological control of insect pests and weeds in Florida.


Tuesday, July 23, 2002, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. (4th TUESDAY, NOT THE LAST)

Combining Fruit Trees and Natives in the Home Landscape. Speaker: Dr. Carl Campbell.

"Fruit trees and other non-natives, planted in combination with native species can provide for a diverse, multiple use home landscape compatible with urban South Florida. Such landscapes can provide the home gardener with a bounty of useful fruit and plant product .... a landscape can be developed that provides the maximum benefit to the home gardener and contributes to a healthy and sustainable environment." The program will be presented by Dr. Carl Campbell. Carl is a native plant expert. Before retiring, he researched all aspects of fruit production at the University of Florida's Tropical Research Center in Homestead and was also a private consultant for mango growers in the tropics.


Tuesday, June 25, 2002 Annual Summer Solstice Evening Yard Visit and Social. NOT AT FAIRCHILD.

This meeting is for FNPS members and their guests only. Please join so that you can enjoy all the activities offered by the chapter!

What: A yard visit to a home in South Miami to see a large collection of natives, both common and uncommon, and a stroll to other native plant gardens in this shady neighborhood.


Tuesday, May 28,2002, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Rare Plants of South Florida — Keith Bradley, Institute for Regional Conservation.

Keith will be discussing species that The Institute for Regional Conservation, after seven years of research, have found to be the most critically imperiled plant species south of Lake Okeechobee. Photographs of many of the species will be shown, and the history and conservation status of each species will be discussed.


Tuesday, April 23, 2002, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Invasive Plant Management in Everglades National Park - Jonathan Taylor , Supervisory Botanist, ENP

Jonathan Taylor will speak about the current programs of invasive exotic plant management in Everglades National Park and restoration of native plant communities, especially in the Flamingo area, which has been severely impacted by Brazilian pepper.

Jon manages the exotic plant removal programs and other vegetation projects in ENP and Dry Tortugas.


Tuesday, March 26, 2002, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

IMPORTANT: The parking lot may be filled by 7 p.m. because of a moonlight tour for Fairchild members. Please see note in newsletter.

Dr. Evelyn Gaiser of Florida International University will speak about periphyton in the Everglades. A very conspicuous feature of most Everglades marshes is a thick, spongy, white mat that floats at the surface of the water, called periphyton. Periphyton contains microscopic algae, bacteria, fungi, invertebrate animals that live in tight association with one another. The algae are very diverse and beautiful. Dr. Gaiser will explain how these algae can be used to track environmental changes associated with pollution or restoration of Everglades marshes.

Dr. Gaiser is Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology and Southeast Environmental Research Center at FIU.


Tuesday, February 26, 2002, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Joyce and Don Gann will discuss questions they encountered over the years as growers and sellers of native plants — and hopefully provide helpful answers. Write down and bring your own questions about native plant choice, horticulture, care, propagation -- anything. The Ganns are natives of Homestead where Don was a tomato farmer and Joyce a naturalist at Castellow Hammock Park before they started Gann’s Native Tropical Greenery Nursery in 1975, retiring 2 years ago.


Tuesday, January 22, 2002 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. [4th Tuesday — not the last!]

Miami-Dade County Commissioner Katy Sorenson will speak about a variety of environmental issues faced by the commission.


Tuesday, November 27, 2001 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Tree Snails of North Key Largo Hammocks -- Dr. Deborah Shaw, Director of Environmental Affairs for the Florida Keys Electric Cooperative.

What could go with trees in Key Largo more than Liguus tree snails? If you have ever been on a field trip to Key Largo, you have certainly admired this colorful wildlife. Dr. Shaw will present the natural history and distribution of the tree snail (Liguus fasciatus) in North Key Largo hammocks. She will also discuss the impacts of electric utility right-of-way maintenance on tree snails and management practices undertaken by FKEC to minimize negative impacts on tree snail populations.


SPECIAL PROGRAM: Butterfly and native plant expert Dr. Marc Minno will present "The Secret Life of Butterflies, Butterfly Love and Life in Your Garden" at 1 p.m. on October 28 at Fairchild Tropical Garden. Marc is a biologist with St. Johns River Water Management District, co-author of four books on butterflies, including Florida Butterfly Gardening, Butterflies of the Florida Keys, and Butterflies Through Binoculars, Florida Edition, and former resident of Broward County. This special program is sponsored by DCFNPS, FTG and others. The program will be followed by book signing (FTG will sell the books) and a butterfly walk at 3 p.m. with Dr. Minno and other butterfly experts. The event is free to the public after admission to the Garden. Members of FNPS (and other sponsoring organizations) and their guests may enter the Garden free to attend this program.


Tuesday, October 23, 2001 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. [the 4th, not last, Tuesday]

Florida Keys Natural Areas: Acquisition and Management for Biodiversity. Speaker: Chris Bergh, Land Conservation Program Manager, The Nature Conservancy.

Chris will discuss the history, current status and future of conservation land acquisition in the Keys, including land in National Parks and Wildlife Refuges, State Parks, Botanical Sites, Geologic Sites and Buffer Preserves, the Florida Keys Wildlife and Environmental Area, county and local municipality parks and private nature preserves. The discussion of natural resources management will focus on invasive non-native species control efforts, fire management in the lower Keys pine rocklands, hydrologic restoration projects and volunteer activities in support of these strategies. Besides slides of maps, aerial photographs and landscapes, Chris will also show slides some Keys specialty plants and wildlife that we might see during the November field trip.


Tuesday, September 25, 2001, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Stars of the Wildflower World: A Look at the Asteraceae. Speaker: Chuck McCartney.

After the orchid family, there are probably more species of asters, daisies and their kin in the family Asteraceae than any other group of vascular plants, with estimates of 23,000 species worldwide. More than 400 species are reported for Florida, with 130 reported for Miami-Dade County, 57 for the Keys, 43 for mainland Monroe County, and 97 for Broward County. Chuck McCartney, wildflower enthusiast and FNPS member, will share a look at what makes the Aster family distinctive within the plant world and illustrate these traits with color slides, concentrating on the species native to southeastern Florida.


Tuesday, July 24, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road (4th -- not last -- Tuesday).

Good and Bad Beasties in the Native Plant Garden. Speaker: Adrian Hunsberger, University of Florida/Miami-Dade Extension office.

We usually think of birds, butterflies and small mammals as the wildlife associated with native plants. But what about all the other insects? Adrian will discuss both harmful and beneficial insects associated with native plants in South Florida as well as ways of dealing with pest insects. Adrian is the Urban Horticulture Agent and Entomologist at the UF/Miami-Dade Extension, a DCFNSP member, and writer of the column "Plant Clinic" in the Sunday edition of The Miami Herald.

There is no meeting or newsletter in August,


Tuesday, June 26: Annual summer solstice evening garden tour and social (not at Fairchild).

Location: Gifford Arboretum, University of Miami
Time: 6:45 - 9 PM. Come early to take advantage of the light.
Activities: Tours, refreshments, socializing, plant raffle.
Bring: Refreshments, raffle donations, lawn chair.
Rain plans: Bring an umbrella. Call 305-255-6404 for info if the weather is very bad.

Instead of our annual "June yard visit" we will see the Gifford Arboretum’s large collection of tropical and sub-tropical trees, many native to Florida, and the Keys satellite planting.

Tours of the arboretum will begin at 6:45 and 7:30, and a tour of the Keys satellite planting will leave from the arboretum at 7:15. Gather for refreshments and native plant raffle at about 8 PM (under shelter if it is raining). Everyone is encouraged to contribute snacks to the pot-luck refreshment table. Lawn chairs might be nice to have. Directions: Take Miller Road east until it ends. Turn left on San Amaro and enter the 3rd parking lot on the right opposite Robbia (NW corner of campus). See newsletter for more details.


Tuesday, May 22, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road (4th -- not last -- Tuesday).

Invasive Exotic Organisms and the Ecology of Invasion. Dr. Robert Doren, Everglades Restoration Program.

Congress established the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task force to coordinate the restoration efforts for the ecosystem, including addressing the threats to restoration such as invasive exotic plants. Dr. Robert Doren will be speaking to us about his work on the Noxious Exotic Weed Task Team (NEWTT). Invasive plants cause substantial losses, reductions in agricultural production, and significant control costs. Billions of dollars are lost each year in the U.S. Millions of hectares of natural areas are infested with exotic plants with a concomitant loss of native species. Hundreds of rare and endangered species and rare habitats are in jeopardy from them.


April 24,2001 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

South Florida plants and their beneficial fungi (mycorrhizae). Jack B. Fisher, Fairchild Tropical Garden

Most native plants are associated with soil fungi that form a symbiosis with the plant roots. These mycorrhizae are beneficial to the plant. Jack will describe and illustrate the various kinds of mycorrhizae. Results of greenhouse experiments show that mycorrhizae promote uptake of phosphorous from our sandy soils of pinelands and coastal dunes. Some native plants must form mycorrhizae in order to grow and reproduce under natural conditions. (Editor's note: This is not a "gardening with mycorrhizae" talk, but those involved in gardening, horticulture, tree-planting projects and restoration should start learning about the research on this topic.)


March 27, 2001: Rob Campbell, grower for Plant Creations, will speak about uncommon natives and places to see them. Tuesday, February 27, 7:30 p.m. at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.


Happy Anniversary Natural Areas Management! Ten Years of Progress, Preservation and Restoration. — Linda McDonald, Miami Dade Park and Recreation Department Natural Areas Management.

Linda McDonald, a restoration biologist with NAM and a past-president of DCFNPS, will tell us about the history of NAM from its humble beginnings, through post-hurricane restoration to the current status of the hardest-hit areas as well as natural areas not devastated by the hurricane, and what is in store for the next ten years. We will hear about NAM’s success stories, some plans gone awry, Environmentally Endangered Lands sites, and lesser-known jewels among Dade County’s collection of natural areas.


Tuesday, January 23, 2001, 7:30 p.m., at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road. [The 4th, not last, Tuesday.]

Non-Timber Forest Products: Can they save our forests? -- Kristine Stewart, Florida International University. Many experts claim the harvest of products other than timber is the answer to "saving our forests". However, the question is whether these non-timber forest products (NTFP), (such as fruits, seeds, bark, or latex) can be harvested sustainably. Kristine Stewart of Florida International University and DCFNPS member will discuss two examples of NTFP that address this question. One of them is our familiar Spanish moss, the basis of a booming Florida industry since the 1920s. The second example is the medicinal tree, the African cherry, which is found only in mountainous parts of Africa. It is used as an effective herbal remedy to treat enlarged prostates. Hear these two stories and decide for yourself if NTFP is the solution to the complex problem of tropical deforestation.


Tuesday, November 28, 7:30 p.m., at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Martin County Environmentally Sensitive Lands Program. Sandra Vardaman of the Martin County Environmentally Sensitive Lands program will give an overview of the program and the natural resources it is overseeing. She will have pictures of some of the sites managed by the program representing several different types of plant communities. She will also discuss some of the management issues involved in preservation of these sites as well as future plans (wish list) for the program. Some of the plant communities and species will be seen on our December field trip to Jonathan Dickinson State Park, so consider this your field trip "homework". Sandra is a member of FNPS and was formerly with Miami-Dade Park’s Natural Areas Management.


Tuesday, October 24, 7:30 p.m., at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"Creating a water environment for wildlife." Martin Buel of Martin Gardens.

Besides trees and shrubs, what could be needed more in a South Florida native plant garden than a water feature catering to birds and other wildlife? Our next speaker will tell you how to make one, whether you have room only for a patio tub or would like to have a sizeable in-ground pond. Martin will cover creating a wetland habitat for the home on any level -- from a simple barrel arrangement to larger projects. He will discuss how to and why to create a wetland habitat as well as the materials you will need (including some nice native plants), how to maintain the habitat and what to expect as the project progresses. The emphasis will be on ponds but there will be some discussion of bog habitats too. On the following Saturday you will have the chance to see one of Martin’s creations in person (see details below).


Tuesday, September 26, 7:30 p.m., at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Status of Pseudophoenix in the Florida Keys — Dena Garvue, Conservation Horticulturist, Fairchild Tropical Garden.

Pseudophoenix sargentii ssp. sargentii (Sargent's cherry palm or buccaneer palm) is the only species of this genus found in North America and is the rarest Florida native palm. Today, Biscayne National Park contains the last wild population of the Sargent's cherry palm in North America. Twelve adult palms, 18 juvenile palms, and seedlings are all that remain of this wild population.

Dena will talk about the work being done to map and monitor palms in the wild and describe the habitat in which this palm grows. She will also talk about work being done to discover how best to propagate and grow this endangered palm.


Tuesday, July 25, 2000, 7:30 p.m., at Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Don Keller will speak about Florida’s Native Epiphytes, including orchids, bromeliads, ferns, lichens and peperomias, and about the adaptations they have made to live where they do (up in trees). He will show slides which he has taken, including some of newly-discovered and very rare plants. Don is a local native plant fancier and has been wandering around Florida looking at plants for 30 years, so you know he has tales to tell as well as photos to show. The quiz will be the following Saturday when we visit Don’s garden (see announcement below).


Tuesday, June 27, 2000, Annual Summer Solstice Evening Yard Visit and Social. NOT AT FAIRCHILD.

Stroll through the native garden of a chapter member and then spend the rest of the evening socializing with other native plant fans. This meeting is for FNPS members and their guests only. If you aren’t a member, why not join now so you can enjoy all the activities?


Tuesday, May 23, 2000, 7:30 p.m., Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

Restoring South Florida’s "sense of place". George Gann, Director, Institute for Regional Conservation.

George, an environmental consultant, South Dade native and DCFNPS member, will talk about restoring an ecologically healthy "sense of place" and understanding how we as people fit into the ecological fabric of the place we call Florida. This talk will provide a framework to move the concepts of natural landscaping and gardening forward to better provide for the conservation and restoration of native plants and the natural environment.


Tuesday, April 25, 2000, 7:30 p.m., Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"Remember the Florida 12!" Chris Migliaccio, Associate Professor of Natural Sciences at Miami-Dade Community College.

Slides from all over the state will illustrate this program on the natural history and horticultural uses of Florida's native palms and cycad. Chris will share his knowledge for selection and care of the native palms most appropriate for the growing conditions in your garden. Our speaker is a long time member of the International Palm Society as well as the Florida Native Plant Society. He is a published photographer and has taught the palm horticulture classes at Fairchild Tropical Garden for many years.


Tuesday, March 28, 2000, 7:30 p.m., Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"Sustainable Landscaping" - Dr. John H. Parker, Professor of Environmental Science and Chemistry and Coordinator of the Environmental Studies Program at Florida International University.

Urban landscaping can play a crucial role as we try to achieve long term environmental sustainability. Sustainable development requires the integration of environmental, social and economic issues and perspectives. Clearly, sustainable landscaping should focus on local ecological issues such as impacts on natural areas and solid waste management as well as global environmental issues such as climate change. In addition, sustainable landscaping projects should prompt the building of social capital by emphasizing community-building, education Ñ particularly our youth Ñ and partnering with other organizations.

Our speaker is a member of DCFNPS and has been active in many local environmental programs. His research has focused on ecological landscaping, passive solar cooling, energy and resource conservation, energy policy and environmental education.


Tuesday, February 22, 2000, 7:30 p.m., Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road (4th, not last, Tuesday).

"Those Amazing Annoying Grasses (Secrets of an Agrostologist)" - Stinger Guala, Keeper and Curator of the Herbarium, Fairchild Tropical Garden.

The grass family is, without a doubt, the most important family of plants on earth. Its 10000 species include all of our major grain crops, they provide most of our sweetener, most of the forage for livestock, the bamboos, a large percentage of the green biomass on earth that produces the oxygen that we breathe. It is also one of the most amazingly annoying families when it comes to identifying its species. Fortunately, out of necessity has come progress. Agrostologists have been at the forefront in developing new methods of making the identification of grasses easier and more accessible. Interactive keys make it possible for even a botanical novice to get a reliable identification, and large databases and other resources such as the FTG Virtual Herbarium, make it easy to confirm an identification. In this talk, the generation and use of these new resources will be discussed and other secrets of an agrostologist will be revealed.

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Tuesday, January 25 2000, 7:30 p.m., Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Road.

"Wildflowers of the Everglades." Roger Hammer, Naturalist, Miami-Dade Park and Recreation Department. Natural Areas Management.

Roger will cover wildflowers of all seasons and communities within Everglades National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve and Fakahatchee Strand. The slides shown in his talk will be a sneak preview of the ones to be used in his upcoming book on wildflowers of the Everglades. Roger is a member of FNPS, popular speaker to many professional organizations and plant societies, and guide of wildflower walks in the Everglades.


December, 1999 - no meeting or newsletter.


Tuesday, November 23, 1999 7:30 p.m., Fairchild Tropical Garden, 10901 OldCutler Road. (The 4th, not last, Tuesday.)

"South Florida Birds and Some Host Plants: A Tropical Connection." Wil Gilbert, Professor Emeritus, Miami-Dade Community College.

Mr. Gilbert, a biologist, avid birder and DCFNPS member, will present a slide program about South Florida native and exotic birds, their relation to local host plants and connection to the West Indies. He will discuss and show slides of many birds of tropical origin which live and breed successfully in our area and explain why many more "water" birds and fewer "land" birds are native to South Florida compared to areas of similar size farther north. This isn't a "how to landscape for wildlife" program, but it will provide a better understanding of the relation between plants and wildlife, whether you prefer to see birds in the woods or in your garden.


Tuesday, October 26, 1999 7:30 p.m.

“The ecology of scrub plants on the Lake Wales Ridge” - Dr. Eric Menges, Senior Research Biologist at Archbold Biological Station.

Dr. Menges will describe ongoing research on the endemic Florida scrub plants of the Lake Wales Ridge, many of which occur at Archbold Biological Station, a 5000 acre natural area and research institute near Lake Placid and the site of our November field trip. He will show many color slides of plants and habitats which we may see on the trip and discuss the responses of scrub plants to fire and other disturbances and their long-term prospects for survival in an increasingly-fragmented landscape. This research has direct implications for the conservation and land management of Florida scrub.


Tuesday, September 28, 1999, 7:30 p.m.

Colonel Terrence "Rock" Salt, Executive Director of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force. As Executive Director for the past 5 years, Col. Salt reports directly to the Assistant Secretary of the Department of the Interior for Fish, Wildlife and Parks. His primary duties include coordinating Everglades restoration policy, plans and projects among the federal, state, tribal and local government agencies in South Florida. Col. Salt was involved in getting the Restudy started off in the right direction when he was district engineer for the Army Corps of Engineers in Jacksonville, displaying a broad view of the Corps' responsibilities. He also has a technical background and understands what can and can't be done. The Restudy, if implemented, will be the most comprehensive effort to restore an ecosystem ever undertaken anywhere.


August - no meeting or newsletter.


Tuesday, July 27, 1999, 7:30 p.m.

An Overview of Florida's Ferns - Gil Nelson .

Gil Nelson will speak about Florida's fern species. Besides showing slides of many ferns (including some very unusual and strange), he will discuss the number and diversity of these species, their characteristics, and tips on identifying them.

Gil is the author of numerous articles and books, including Shrubs and Woody Vines of Florida , Trees of Florida (both sold by our chapter and available at meetings), Exploring Wild Northwest Florida , Exploring Wild North Florida , and a field guide to Florida's ferns to be published in 2000.


Tuesday, June 22, 1999, Summer Solstice Evening Yard Visit.
NOT AT FAIRCHILD - 4th TUESDAY, NOT LAST
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This month's meeting is our annual summer solstice yard visit and social. We will visit two homes in South Miami landscaped with native plants and enjoy a chance to get better acquainted with fellow-DCFNPS members. This meeting is for DCFNPS members and their guests only - a good reason to join!


Tuesday, April 27, 1999, 7:30 p.m.

Tony Pernas, Resource Management Specialist at Big Cypress National Preserve, will update us on research projects, management activities, and land acquisition in the 728,000-acre wilderness preserve. Ongoing projects include panther monitoring, assessing the impact of off-road vehicles, prescribed fire and exotic plant control. He will also give us a glimpse of the spectacular scenery with his excellent photography..


Tuesday, March 23, 1999, 7:30 p.m.

The Everglades Ecosystem and Restudy - Jean Evoy, Section Chief, Wetland and Forest Resources Section, Miami-Dade County's Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM), will discuss the Everglades ecosystem and the problems that have emerged over the past 50 years, and give an overview of what the Central and South Florida Comprehensive Plan Restudy hopes to accomplish for Everglades restoration.

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